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This very informative and relevant interview with Janet Foutty, Chairman and CEO of Deloitte Consulting, provides an excellent analysis of the environment that today’s businesses must operate within. The discussion about globalization, transformative technologies and talent management is thought provoking and points to challenges that today’s leaders must address to succeed.

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AcquiTivity has been following this battle with considerable interest since not long after Palantir’s software came into use in the Army. It first came to light as a useful tool for analysts to use while waiting for the functionality of a competing program of record to come online.

While this article and these conditions aren’t new, it appears that there is a chance that in this one case, disruption in the normal business processes of the Pentagon is happening. Of course, the Pentagon is a very big place and this is only one system in one branch of service. Does it take this sort of a well-funded campaign by an outsider to make a difference?

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by Paul Barrett
April 4, 2017, 6:00 AM EDT
From BloombergBusinessWeek

A pointy-beaked F-35B Lightning II idles noisily on a runway at Naval Air Station Patuxent River in southern Maryland. Suddenly the plane roars to life and sprints a mere 300 feet before abruptly lifting off and soaring into a cloudless, late-winter sky over Chesapeake Bay. A while later it zooms back into view, slows to a hover over the runway like a helicopter, then drops straight down to the concrete, where it lands with a gentle bounce.
A U.S. Marine Corps test pilot is manning the controls. If he were Air Force or Navy, his version of the military’s highly anticipated new fighter jet wouldn’t have this capacity to take off and land on a dime—though it would come with other custom features. This is why Air Force Lieutenant General Christopher Bogdan, who’s in charge of overseeing the acquisition of the F-35, brought three plastic models of the fighter jet to a December 2016 meeting with Donald Trump at his Florida residence.

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By Sandra I. Irwin
March 27, 2017
National Defense Magazine

Defense contractors can expect the Pentagon to take increasingly tough negotiating positions as future procurements move forward.

That was in a nutshell the message delivered by senior officials last week at an industry conference in Washington, D.C.

In extensive comments to an audience of executives and investors, Director of Defense Pricing Shay Assad and F-35 Program Executive Officer Lt. Gen. Christopher Bogdan made it clear that they intend to push contractors into a corner.

Defense companies are in the best financial shape in years, but little of that windfall is trickling down into military programs, they complained. The government will seek to regain leverage and press contractors to “bring down the cost of DoD weapon systems,” Assad said at the annual McAleese Credit Suisse defense programs conference.

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Federal agencies spent over $430 billion on contracts for goods and services in 2015—almost 40 percent of all discretionary spending. To strengthen contracting practices and increase oversight of government spending, we analyzed contract data and identified overall trends in spending, competition, and contract type.
From 2011 to 2015, we found that spending at defense agencies decreased by almost 32 percent, while spending at civilian agencies remained fairly steady. We also found that contracts awarded through competition stayed steady at about 64 percent, and the use of fixed price contracts stayed steady at over 63 percent.

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