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The federal government plans to invest almost $96 billion on IT in fiscal year 2018. Historically, these investments have too often failed, incurred cost overruns and schedule slippages, or contributed little to mission-related outcomes. Accordingly, in December 2014, Congress enacted FITARA, aimed at improving agencies’ acquisitions of IT. Further, in February 2015, GAO added improving the management of IT acquisitions and operations to its high-risk list.
This statement summarizes agencies’ progress in improving the management of IT acquisitions and operations. This statement is based on GAO prior and recently published reports on (1) data center consolidation, (2) risk levels of major investments as reported on OMB’s IT Dashboard, (3) implementation of incremental development practices, and (4) management of software licenses.

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The Department of Defense (DOD) faces five key challenges that significantly affect the department’s ability to accomplish its mission. These include the need to (1) rebalance forces and rebuild readiness; (2) mitigate threats to cyberspace and expand cyber capabilities; (3) control the escalating costs of programs, such as certain weapon systems acquisitions and military health care, and better manage its finances; (4) strategically manage its human capital; and (5) achieve greater efficiencies in defense business operations. DOD has demonstrated progress addressing challenges, but significant work remains.

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Much has changed in the U.S. Navy over the past 100 years, from technology to tactics. Yet one topic has not. The fleet’s support facilities consistently have taken a back seat to current operations.
Modernization standards set in 2013, right before sequestration hit, will not be met anytime soon. Maintenance overruns brought on by the implementation of the Optimized Fleet Response Plan only exacerbate the problem. Further, the age of the Navy’s existing infrastructure continues to degrade shore repair capabilities. Naval yard infrastructure is more than 60 years old on average, and our dry docks average more than 80 years old. Existing dry docks are being modernized and expanded to accommodate the new, larger Gerald R. Ford -class carriers and Improved Block V Virginia -class submarines, but these projects are scheduled to be completed barely in time for the first dockings of these class leaders .

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